Getting Started with the ESP-03


The ESP-03 is a very affordable Wi-Fi module built around the ESP8266EX chip by Espressif. The ESP8266 has become very popular among makers who want to add wireless smarts to things at home and work.

The ESP-03 has two useful modes of operation that can be initiated by controlling its GPIO pins – normal mode and flash mode.

Normal mode wiring is show in the figure below. ESP-03 shown here is powered using SparkFun’s FTDI Basic Breakout – 3.3V – USB to serial module.

Normal Mode

In this mode, ESP-03 executes firmware programmed to the SPI Flash. SPI Flash is an external NOR Flash chip where program instructions are stored, and retrieved during execution.

The ESP-03 has a 4 Mbit 25Q40BT part which allows for 512 KB of program space. Of that, about 423 KB is available for your own programs.

Serial Flash Chip

In flash mode, new program instructions can be flashed to SPI Flash, using tools such as the ESP Flash Download Tool. The wiring is similar to that for normal mode, with the addition of GPIO0 connected to GND.

Flash Mode

ESP8266 can be programmed using an SDK distributed by Espressif. Popular embedded development platforms such as the Arduino IDE, MicroPython, and Lua can also be used.

Adafruit provides instructions for configuring the Arduino IDE for ESP8266 development. Here’re the settings I use with the Arduino IDE – under Tools menu.

Arduino Settings

Try the example project under File -> Examples -> ESP8266WiFi. With it, you’ll be controlling a GPIO pin on the ESP-03, over your Wi-Fi network, in no time at all.

wifi-web-server.gif
Wi-Fi Web Server
Advertisements

Run homebridge as a service upon reboot


This post shows how to run homebridge automatically upon reboot using upstart. If you’re using systemd, the default initialization system these days, see Running Homebridge on Bootup (systemd).

Install upstart

sudo apt-get install upstart

Create configuration file /etc/init/homebridge.conf with

start on stopped rc
stop on shutdown

setuid pi

script
    export HOME="/home/pi"
    export NODE_PATH=$HOME/node_modules/
    gpio -g mode 27 out
    gpio -g mode 27 down
    gpio export 27 out
    exec /usr/local/bin/homebridge
end script

start on stopped rc ensures that avahi-daemon has been started by its SysV init script under /etc/init.d before homebridge is started.

Test the job by running it thus

sudo start homebridge

Use the following command to check the output of the job

sudo tail -f /var/log/upstart/homebridge.log

The following command can be used to verify that homebridge job has been started

sudo initctl list | grep homebridge

To stop the above job

sudo stop homebridge

To run job as a service that will run automatically at boot

sudo service homebridge start

To stop the service forever

sudo service homebridge stop

Toggle GPIO on Raspberry Pi using HomeKit


In this post, I take my HomeKit Raspberry Pi integration a step further, by turning on/off a LED using the homebridge-gpio-wpi plugin. With the ability to control the GPIO pins, I should be able to turn on/off much bigger things using solid state relays and such.

Install homebridge-gpio-wpi

The installation should be pretty straightforward. Assuming you are at the command line in the home folder, run

npm install homebridge-gpio-wpi

That should install all node modules under ~/node_modules/.

Configure homebridge by editing ~/.homebridge/config.json. Here’s mine

{
    "bridge": {
        "name": "Homebridge",
        "username": "CC:22:3D:E3:CE:32",
        "port": 51826,
        "pin": "031-45-155"
    },
    
    "description": "This has some fake accessories",

    "accessories": [
        {
            "accessory":      "FakeBulb",
            "name":           "Test lamp",
            "bulb_name":      "Lamp 1"
        },
        {
            "accessory": "GPIO",
            "name": "GPIO2",
            "pin": 27
        }
    ],

    "platforms": []
}

Configure GPIO2 using the gpio utility, and start homebridge

gpio -g mode 27 out
gpio -g mode 27 down
gpio export 27 out
export NODE_PATH=$HOME/node_modules/
homebridge

See also how to run homebridge as a service upon reboot.

Test with HomeKit

If you’ve configured the Homebridge peripheral in an iOS app such as Hesperus, it should now show you a new device called GPIO2, and allow you to switch it on/off.

LED

Hesperus allows you to create a schedule to turn on and off devices.

Schedule